Cheese Cake

Amazing 3 ingredient cheesecake. Works and is yumo.
1kg yogurt mixed with one tin condensed milk. Crush packet of biscuits and pour crumbs in a microwave proof container. I used glass. Pour the yogurt mixture on top of crumbs. Microwave for 5 min. Cool n eat. Works with low fat yogurt. NO butter mixed in crumbs. When the yogurt cooks it makes crumbs hard. The yogurt turns into a soft cream cheese when cool. Did i say yumo ?? Oh definitely.

• 1 1/2 cups crushed graham crackers
• 1 teaspoon white sugar
• 1/8 teaspoon ground cinnamon (optional)
• 1/4 cup chopped pecans (optional)
• 4 tablespoons melted butter
• 2 (8 ounce) packages cream cheese, softened
• 3 eggs
• 1 cup sugar
• 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
• 1 (16 ounce) container sour cream
• Add all ingredients to list
Directions
1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Whisk together the crushed graham crackers, the 1 teaspoon sugar, cinnamon, and walnuts. Stir in the butter. Press the mixture into the bottom of a 9 inch springform pan.
2. Bake in the preheated oven for 10 minutes. Remove from oven; allow crust to cool.
3. Beat the cream cheese with the eggs on medium-low with an electric mixer until smooth. Beat in the 1 cup sugar and vanilla. Fold in the sour cream just until blended. Do not overmix; ovemixing causes the cheesecake to crack. Pour into the cooled crust.
4. Bake in the preheated oven for 30 minutes. Turn oven off. When the cheesecake has reached room temperature, chill in refrigerator for 8 hours before serving.
For the graham cracker crust:

About 11 double graham crackers, broken into pieces (or 1-1/2 cups graham cracker crumbs )
2 Tbs. granulated sugar
5 Tbs. unsalted butter, melted
For the filling:

1 lb. cream cheese, softened to room temperature
1 cup granulated sugar
6 large egg yolks
3 Tbs. fresh lemon juice
1-1/2 tsp. pure vanilla extract
1/4 tsp. table salt
3 cups sour cream
Heat the oven to 350°F. Grease the bottom and sides of an 8 x 2-1/2-inch or higher springform pan.

Make the crust:
In a food processor, process the graham crackers and sugar until the cookies are fine crumbs, about 20 seconds. Add the melted butter and pulse about 10 times just until incorporated. (Alternatively, seal the cookies in a heavy-duty plastic bag and use a rolling pin to crush them into fine crumbs. Transfer to a bowl, add the sugar, and toss with a fork to blend. Stir in the melted butter and toss to incorporate.)

Using your fingers or the back of a spoon, press the mixture into the base of the prepared pan and partway up the sides. Use a flat-bottomed, straight-sided glass to smooth the crumbs over the bottom and farther up the sides (but not all the way to the top). Be sure to press the bottom thoroughly so that the crumbs are evenly distributed. Lay plastic wrap over the crumbs to keep them from sticking to your fingers, and use your fingers to continue pressing the crust to a thin, even layer. Wrap the outside of the pan with a double layer of heavy-duty aluminum foil to prevent leaking. Cover the crust with plastic wrap and refrigerate until needed.

Make the filling:
In the large bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, beat the cream cheese and sugar until very smooth, about 3 minutes, scraping the bowl and beaters as needed. Beat in the egg yolks, beating until the batter is smooth and scraping down the sides as necessary. Add the lemon juice, vanilla, and salt and beat until incorporated. Beat in the sour cream just until blended.

Bake the cheesecake:
Pour the batter into the prepared springform pan. Set the pan in a larger pan (a 12 x 2-inch cake pan or a roasting pan) and surround it with 1 inch of very hot water. Check that the oven is at 350°F and bake the cake for 45 minutes. Turn off the oven without opening the door and let the cake cool for 1 hour. Transfer the cheesecake to a rack (the center will still be jiggly) and cool to room temperature, about 1 hour. Cover the pan with plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least 6 hours or overnight.

Unmold and slice the cheesecake:
Be sure the cheesecake is thoroughly chilled. Have ready a serving plate and another flat plate that’s at least as wide as the springform and covered in plastic wrap. Wipe a hot, damp cloth around the outside of the ring (or use a hair dryer). Run a metal spatula or a thin knife inside the ring. Release and gently loosen the ring and then lift it off. Set the plate with the plastic wrap on top of the cheesecake and carefully invert the pan. Heat the base of the springform with a hot, damp cloth or hair dryer and lift it off. Set the serving plate lightly on the bottom of the cheesecake (which is now facing up) and reinvert the cake. Lift off the plastic-wrapped plate.

To cut neat slices, use a sharp, thin-bladed knife dipped in hot water (shake off excess drops) between each slice.

I discovered just how astonishingly good pumpkin is when not obscured by cinnamon and ginger when I tasted a pumpkin mousse prepared by Jehanne Burch at the Castle Hill Inn & Resort in Newport, Rhode Island. Her mousse contained only pumpkin, sugar, heavy cream, and gelatin. It was a revelation. If you use an electric mixer, start by beating the cream cheese with the whisk attachment until it’s very smooth, and then add the cooked pumpkin mixture and the remaining ingredients.

more about:

gingersnaps pure solid-pack pumpkin pecans cream cheese cinnamon cream egg yolks eggs butter granulated sugar table salt
For the crust:

4-1/4 oz. gingersnap cookies (about 17 two-inch cookies), broken into pieces
2 oz. (1/2 cup) pecans, toasted
1 Tbs. granulated sugar
2 pinches table salt
1/2 tsp. ground cinnamon (optional)
4 Tbs. unsalted butter, melted
For the filling:

1 cup unsweetened pumpkin purée (I like Libby’s)
1 cup granulated sugar
2 cups heavy cream, chilled
1 lb. cream cheese, softened to room temperature
2 large eggs
2 large egg yolks
For the garnish:

About 24 pecan halves, toasted
Heat the oven to 350°F. Grease the bottom and sides of a 9×21/2-inch or higher springform pan.

Make the crust:
In a food processor, process the cookies with the pecans, sugar, salt, and cinnamon (if using) until the cookies become fine crumbs, about 20 seconds. Add the melted butter and pulse about 10 times, just until incorporated. (Alternatively, put the cookies in a freezer bag and use a rolling pin to crush them into fine crumbs. Grind the nuts finely but not to a powder. In a medium bowl, combine all the crust ingredients except the butter and toss with a fork to blend. Stir in the melted butter and toss to incorporate.)

Using your fingers or the back of a spoon, press the mixture into the base of the prepared pan and partway up the sides. Use a flat-bottomed, straightsided glass to smooth the crumbs over the bottom and farther up the sides (but not all the way to the top). Be sure to press the bottom thoroughly so that the crumbs are evenly distributed. Lay plastic wrap over the crumbs to keep them from sticking to your fingers, and use your fingers to continue pressing the crust to a thin, even layer. Wrap the outside of the pan with a double layer of heavy-duty aluminum foil to prevent leaking. Cover the crust with plastic wrap and refrigerate until needed.

Make the filling:
In a small, heavy saucepan, combine the pumpkin purée and sugar. Over medium heat, bring the mixture to a sputtering simmer, stirring constantly, about 5 minutes. Turn the heat to low and cook, stirring constantly, until the mixture has darkened and thickened to the consistency of applesauce, about 5 minutes.

Scrape the mixture into a large food processor and process for 1 minute. with the feed tube open (so steam can escape), scraping down the sides. With the motor running, add the chilled cream. Add the softened cream cheese and process for 30 seconds or until smoothly incorporated, scraping down the sides two or three times. Add the eggs and yolks and process for about 5 seconds, just until incorporated.

Bake the cheesecake:
Pour the batter into the prepared pan. Set the pan in a larger pan (a 12×2-inch cake pan or a roasting pan) and surround it with 1 inch of very hot water. Check that the oven is at 350°F and bake the cheesecake for 45 minutes. Turn off the oven without opening the door and let the cheesecake cool for 1 hour. Transfer the cake to a rack (the center will still be jiggly) and cool to room temperature, about 1 hour. Cover the pan with plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least 6 hours or overnight. .

Umold, garnish, and slice:
Be sure the cheesecake is thoroughly chilled. Have ready a serving plate and another flat plate that’s at least as wide as the springform and covered in plastic wrap. Wipe a hot, damp cloth around the outside of the ring (or use a hair dryer). Run a metal spatula or a thin knife inside the ring. Release and gently loosen the ring and then lift it off. Set the plate with the plastic wrap on top of the cheesecake and carefully invert the pan. Heat the base of the springform with a hot, damp cloth or hair dryer and lift it off. Set the serving plate lightly on the bottom of the cheesecake (which is now facing up) and reinvert the cake. Lift off the plastic-wrapped plate.

Arrange the pecan halves around the perimeter of the cake. To cut neat slices, use a sharp, thin-bladed knife dipped in hot water (shake off excess drops) between each slice.

If there could be only one type of cake in the world, let it be cheesecake. Of course, some people would argue that cheesecake, with its smooth, creamy texture, isn’t really a cake at all except in shape. Indeed, my favorite style of cheesecake is more custard than cake, set by eggs rather than by starch. That’s the key to its satiny texture. As long as I treat cheesecake like a custard, coddling it in a water bath and baking it until set at the edges but still wobbly in the center, I never fail to get the supremely smooth texture that I adore.

Cheesecake is the easiest cake to make. It can be mixed in minutes with an electric mixer or in less than a minute in a food processor. My basic cheesecake is dense, creamy, and tangy. It consists simply of cream cheese, sour cream, fresh lemon juice, sugar, eggs, salt, and pure vanilla extract. Some cheesecake recipes include flour or cornstarch to help firm them up, but I prefer to let the eggs do all the thickening rather than add a starch, which would produce a slightly denser texture (see Cheesecake 101 for a discussion of cheesecakes with starch and without). For the cream cheese, I like Philadelphia brand. Natural and lowfat cream cheeses don’t seem to work as well. Bring the cream cheese to room temperature so it softens and blends completely with the other ingredients. To prevent aeration, which can cause the cheesecake to rise unevenly, be careful not to overmix the batter.

I like to dress up cheesecakes with a crust and a topping. I might use cookie crumbs or a thin layer of tender sponge cake for a crust. For a stunning special-occasion cheesecake, I might line the sides of the pan with ladyfingers. My pumpkin cheesecake is heavenly when garnished with swirls of caramel sauce. Fruit glazes thickened with cornstarch (not gelatin, which would dissolve from acidity in the batter) make wonderful toppings; try sour cherry, blueberry, cranberry, or even a lemon curd.

Choose the right size pan

Pat down the crumbs with your fingers and then use a straight-sided glass to press and push the crumbs up the walls.
The ideal pan for cheesecake is a springform. A deep cake pan will also work, but you’ll have to invert the cheesecake twice to unmold it. My classic cheesecake needs an 8-inch pan; the pumpkin one needs a 9-inch pan. Be safe: measure with a ruler, inside rim to inside rim. Pan size is important because it affects cooking time (in too small a pan, the filling will rise higher and take longer to cook; vice versa for too big a pan).

Crushed cookie crusts provide contrasting texture and flavor. Sometimes I press the cookie crumbs into the pan so they become a shell for the filling. I like a thin crust that goes almost all the way up the sides of the cake (see the photos below). Another option is to bake the cheesecake without a crust and then pat the cookie crumbs on the sides after chilling. To do this, crush about 3/4 cup of crumbs. Scoop up some crumbs in one hand, hold the cake on its base in the palm of the other hand, and then, tilting the cake a bit, press the crumbs gently onto the sides.

Cover the crust with a double layer of plastic to prevent sticking and continue spreading the crust with your fingers.

Wrap the pan in a double layer of heavy-duty aluminum foil to prevent leakage.

finecooking.com/articles/smooth-creamy-cheesecake.aspx?pg=1

This Grand Canyon crack, which formed after refrigeration, indicates that the cheesecake spent too much time in the oven.
by Shirley Corriher

fromFine Cooking
Issue 35

You may not have realized it, but cheesecakes are just custards that happen to be made with cream cheese instead of milk. And like custards, there are two major categories of cheesecake—those with starch and those without. Adding starch to cheesecakes, or to any custard, affects both the cooking method and the texture, making it firmer and less likely to curdle or weep.

Without starch, cheesecakes are creamy
The texture of a cheesecake without starch is quite smooth and, if the batter contains sour cream, it’s also incredibly creamy: a sensuous, luxurious combination that’s perfect for a rich dessert cheesecake (see the recipes Classic Creamy Cheesecake and Pumpkin Cheesecake with Gingersnap & Pecan Crust).

Without starch, cheesecakes rely on eggs for their thickening power. Thickening occurs when raw egg proteins unwind and link together, which is what happens when eggs cook. Also, emulsifiers in the egg yolk—lecithin and lipoproteins—help give the cheesecake a smooth texture.

Like other custards without starch, cheesecakes need gentle heat to prevent curdling. A little heat cooks the proteins just enough to make them loosely link together to form a thick but smooth texture; but beyond a certain heat threshold, the proteins tighten up and form curds. As with crème anglaise (a boiled custard), which must be stirred constantly over very low heat, a cheesecake without starch must be baked very gently and evenly to avoid curdling.

There are several ways to shield a cheesecake without starch against too much heat. Betsy Murrelle, a cookware shop owner in Banner Elk, North Carolina (and an outstanding cook), bakes her cheesecakes in a 275°F oven for one hour, and then leaves them in the turned-off oven for another hour. My friend Doris Koplin, a professional baker and cheesecake expert, bakes her cheesecake without starch at 350°F for 30-minutes (just enough time to get the batter hot) and then she turns off the heat and leaves the cheesecake in the closed oven for about an hour to continue cooking very slowly.

Another method is to bake the cheesecake in a water bath. In a 350°F oven, the temperature in a water bath will hover around 200°F, which allows the custard to set without curdling.

Cheesecakes with starch set up firm
When you add cornstarch or flour to cheesecake, the texture becomes firmer and coarser—maybe not ideal for a dessert, but I find it quite appropriate for a savory cheesecake. The thickening occurs when the granules of starch are heated, which causes them to swell and eventually pop, releasing their contents and creating a tangled network of molecules.

Starch in the batter affects the method of cooking. Just as crème pâtissière (pastry cream), which is essentially a crème anglaise plus starch, can be cooked over direct medium-low heat without curdling, so can a cheesecake with starch be cooked without a water bath in a moderately hot oven. In this case, the starch protects the eggs from scrambling by preventing egg coagulation. How? I lean toward a theory that swollen starch granules physically “get in the way” of the linking egg proteins, thereby slowing down coagulation. Whatever the mechanism, the presence of starch means you can safely cook cheesecake at 325°F for up to an hour without a water bath, just as you can bring crème pâtissière to a boil without fear of curdling.

Why cheesecakes crack
The question I’m asked most frequently about cheesecakes is “Why did my cheesecake crack?” It’s difficult for cooks to believe my answer: it’s overcooked. “That can’t be,” the cook protests. “The center jiggled a tiny bit, as if it weren’t done.” That’s true when the cake is hot, but examine it after chilling and you’ll see that it’s firm and dry right around the crack. Overcooking causes proteins to shrink and the cake to dry out, leading to-cracks.

I think that judging cheesecake doneness is one of the most deceptive and disconcerting things in cooking. I’ve made Rose Levy Beranbaum’s cheesecakes successfully many times, and every time there’s a section in the center, at least three inches in diameter, that wobbles wildly as if it were totally runny inside. I’m always amazed that after chilling, the cake is perfectly cooked.

The simplest way to avoid cracks is to shorten the cooking time, but you also can play with other variables. Sugar slows cooking by blocking the coagulation of proteins, so adding more provides an extra barrier against overcooking. Another option is to cut an egg out of the recipe. Fewer eggs means fewer proteins, a slower rate of coagulation, and slower cooking.

If the unmentionable does occur and you end up with minor fissures in the cake, do what my baker friend Doris does: ice the cake with whipped cream, and no one will ever know the difference.

Ingredients:
For the crust:
1-¼ cup graham cracker crumbs
3 tbsp. sugar
1/3 cup melted butter

For the filling:
2 blocks (16 oz.) cream cheese, softened
1 cup sugar
3 tbsp. sour cream
½ tablespoon vanilla extract
½ tablespoon lemon juice (optional)
2 eggs

Directions:

You can make the pie crust below, or you can just use a premade one from the store. If you use a premade one, try to look for the crusts that says “2 extra servings.” If you can’t find it, just go with the regular ones. You may just have a tad bit of filling leftover.Preheat oven to 300F degrees.

For the crust:
Mix the graham cracker crumbs, sugar and melted butter and pack mixture firmly into bottom and sides of 9-inch pie pan. Chill in the refrigerator while preparing the filling.

For the filling:
Mix cream cheese, sugar, sour cream, vanilla extract and lemon juice in a mixer. Add eggs one at a time to the mixture and thoroughly combine. The key to getting a really creamy cheesecake is to mix these ingredients together really well until the mixture is kind of thick and smooth (about 4-5 minutes.) Pour into pie crust.
Bake for about 65-70 minutes. Chill in the refrigerator a few hours before serving. Optional: top with cherry or strawberry pie filling or drizzle with caramel sauce.

Enjoy!

5 from 7 votes
Print
Easy and Creamy Cheesecake
Course Dessert
Cuisine American
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 1 hour 10 minutes
Total Time 1 hour 20 minutes
Servings 6
Calories 400 kcal
Author Brandie @ The Country Cook
Ingredients
For the crust:
1-¼ cup graham cracker crumbs
3 tablespoons sugar
1/3 cup melted butter
For the filling:
2 8 oz blocks cream cheese softened
1 cup sugar
3 tbsp sour cream
½ tablespoon vanilla extract
½ tablespoon lemon juice optional
2 eggs
Instructions
For the crust:
Mix the graham cracker crumbs, sugar and melted butter and pack mixture firmly into bottom and sides of 9-inch pie pan.
Chill in the refrigerator while preparing the filling.
For the filling:
Mix cream cheese, sugar, sour cream, vanilla extract and lemon juice in a mixer.
Add eggs one at a time to the mixture and thoroughly combine.
The key to getting a really creamy cheesecake is to mix these ingredients together really well until the mixture is kind of thick and smooth (about 4-5 minutes).
Pour into pie crust.
Bake for about 65-70 minutes.
Recipe Notes
You can make the pie crust, or you can just use a premade one from the store. If you use a pre-made one, try to look for the crusts that says “2 extra servings.” If you can’t find it, just go with the regular ones. You may just have a tad bit of filling leftover. Preheat oven to 300F degrees.

Chill in the refrigerator a few hours before serving. Optional: top with cherry or strawberry pie filling or drizzle with caramel sauce.
thecountrycook.net/chief-wilsons-cheesecake/